Sister Morphine
A Perfect Circle - Imagine
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ophelia-:

Imagine (Cover) | A Perfect Circle

A damsel with a dulcimer
In a vision once I saw:
It was an Abyssinian maid,
And on her dulcimer she played,
Singing of Mount Abora.
Could I revive within me
Her symphony and song,
To such a deep delight ‘twould win me
That with music loud and long
I would build that dome in air,
That sunny dome! those caves of ice!
And all who heard should see them there,
And all should cry, Beware! Beware!
His flashing eyes, his floating hair!
Weave a circle round him thrice,
And close your eyes with holy dread,
For he on honey-dew hath fed
And drunk the milk of Paradise.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Kubla Khan

I love opium-inspired poetry.

(via lucyhundley)

tamburina:

Whatever hour you woke there was a door shutting. From room to room they went, hand in hand, lifting here, opening there, making sure—a ghostly couple.

“Here we left it,” she said. And he added, “Oh, but here tool” “It’s upstairs,” she murmured. “And in the garden,” he whispered. “Quietly,” they…

tamburina:

William S. Burroughs

tamburina:

William S. Burroughs

5to1:

John Lennon

5to1:

John Lennon

Where’s your will to be weird?
Jim Morrison (via misswallflower)
Locks of hair taken from friends and loved ones were an important element of Lady Shelley’s sanctum at Boscombe Manor, following Mary Shelley’s own practice in collecting and preserving them. This elaborate case contains (mounted in the trademark gold gilt of the sanctum) locks of hair taken from six of Shelley’s friends: Lord Byron (1822); Leigh Hunt (1817); Byron’s mistress Teresa Guiccioli (no date); the Greek independence fighter Alexander Mavrocordato (1820); Edward John Trelawny (1822); Edward Williams (1821); and the Irish poet Thomas Moore (no date).

Locks of hair taken from friends and loved ones were an important element of Lady Shelley’s sanctum at Boscombe Manor, following Mary Shelley’s own practice in collecting and preserving them. This elaborate case contains (mounted in the trademark gold gilt of the sanctum) locks of hair taken from six of Shelley’s friends: Lord Byron (1822); Leigh Hunt (1817); Byron’s mistress Teresa Guiccioli (no date); the Greek independence fighter Alexander Mavrocordato (1820); Edward John Trelawny (1822); Edward Williams (1821); and the Irish poet Thomas Moore (no date).